Author: vincent


Connect to Azure/Office365 based on encrypted txt file


This will create a remote PowerShell session to your Azure/Office365 based on the Username you specify and the #hashed password text file you created in the previous​ post (that you can find here)
#==============================================================================================
# NAME: Connect to Azure/Office365
# AUTHOR: Vincent Christiansen, vincent@sameie.com
# DATE  : 21/01/2016
# COMMENT: This script will create a remote session in Azure/Office365 based on the encrypted file you have created.
#
# ​​=============================================================================================
$username = “YourServiceAccount@YOURDOMAIN.onmicrosoft.com”
$encrypted = Get-Content “D:\Scripts\Azure_Encrypted_Password.txt” | ConvertTo-SecureString
$cred = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PsCredential($username,$encrypted)
Import-Module MSOnline
Connect-MsolService -Credential $cred
$ExchangeSession = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/powershell-liveid/?proxymethod=rps -Credential $cred -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection
$importresults = Import-PSSession $ExchangeSession

Get MAC address from remote computer


In some settings you need to get a remote computers MAC addresses. And you don’t have access to it physically.

  1. ​Open a CMD window with you Administrative user (one that has admin access to computer objects)
  2. Ping the computer name (to get IP)
    f.eks: PING COMPUTERNAME
    Wait for reply.. 192.168.25.25
  3. type inn getmac /s 192.168.25.25 /v ​

Now you get a list with the MAC addresses.
getmac-address.PNG

Update UPN on multiple users


I recently did an LDIFDE import of a lot of users to a test domain, and the UPN is not sett on the user objects.

So to change/set the UPN for all my users in the test domain I used this little​ string. Worked like a charm

I gets all the users objects in the Domain Sameie.com, and it sets the UPN to username@sameie.info

Get-ADUser -searchbase “DC=sameie,DC=com” -filter * | foreach {set-adusers $_ -userprincipalname (“{0}@{1}” -f $_.samaccountname,”sameie.info”)}

Azure Server Sizes and information regarding them


This information is collected from: Cynthia Nottingham​, and her ar​ticle: virtual-machines-windows-sizes​

​​​The standard sizes consist of several series: A, D, DS, F, Fs, G, and GS. Considerations for some of these sizes include:

  • D-series VMs are designed to run applications that demand higher compute power and temporary disk performance. D-series VMs provide faster processors, a higher memory-to-core ratio, and a solid-state drive (SSD) for the temporary disk. For details, see the announcement on the Azure blog, New D-Series Virtual Machine Sizes.
  • Dv2-series, a follow-on to the original D-series, features a more powerful CPU. The Dv2-series CPU is about 35% faster than the D-series CPU. It is based on the latest generation 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon® E5-2673 v3 (Haswell) processor, and with the Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0, can go up to 3.1 GHz. The Dv2-series has the same memory and disk configurations as the D-series.
  • F-series is based on the 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon® E5-2673 v3 (Haswell) processor, which can achieve clock speeds as high as 3.1 GHz with the Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0. This is the same CPU performance as the Dv2-series of VMs. At a lower per-hour list price, the F-series is the best value in price-performance in the Azure portfolio based on the Azure Compute Unit (ACU) per core.

    The F-series also introduces a new standard in VM size naming for Azure. For this series and VM sizes released in the future, the numeric value after the family name letter will match the number of CPU cores. Additional capabilities, such as optimized for premium storage, will be designated by letters following the numeric CPU core count. This naming format will be used for future VM sizes released but will not retroactively change the names of any existing VM sizes which have been released.

  • G-series VMs offer the most memory and run on hosts that have Intel Xeon E5 V3 family processors.
  • DS-series, DSv2-series, Fs-series and GS-series VMs can use Premium Storage, which provides high-performance, low-latency storage for I/O intensive workloads. These VMs use solid-state drives (SSDs) to host a virtual machine’s disks and also provide a local SSD disk cache. Premium Storage is available in certain regions. For details, see Premium Storage: High-performance storage for Azure virtual machine workloads.
  • The A-series VMs can be deployed on a variety of hardware types and processors. The size is throttled, based upon the hardware, to offer consistent processor performance for the running instance, regardless of the hardware it is deployed on. To determine the physical hardware on which this size is deployed, query the virtual hardware from within the Virtual Machine.
  • The A0 size is over-subscribed on the physical hardware. For this specific size only, other customer deployments may impact the performance of your running workload. The relative performance is outlined below as the expected baseline, subject to an approximate variability of 15 percent.

The size of the virtual machine affects the pricing. The size also affects the processing, memory, and storage capacity of the virtual machine. Storage costs are calculated separately based on used pages in the storage account. For details, see Virtual Machines Pricing Detailsand Azure Storage Pricing.

The following considerations might help you decide on a size:

  • The A8-A11 sizes are also known as compute-intensive instances. The hardware that runs these sizes is designed and optimized for compute-intensive and network-intensive applications, including high-performance computing (HPC) cluster applications, modeling, and simulations. For detailed information and considerations about using these sizes, seeAbout the A8, A9, A10, and A11 compute intensive instances.
  • Dv2-series, D-series, G-series, and the DS/GS counterparts are ideal for applications that demand faster CPUs, better local disk performance, or have higher memory demands. They offer a powerful combination for many enterprise-grade applications.
  • The F-series VMs are an excellent choice for workloads that demand faster CPUs but do not need as much memory or local SSD per CPU core. Workloads such as analytics, gaming servers, web servers, and batch processing will benefit from the value of the F-series.
  • Some of the physical hosts in Azure data centers may not support larger virtual machine sizes, such as A5 – A11. As a result, you may see the error message Failed to configure virtual machine or Failed to create virtual machine when resizing an existing virtual machine to a new size; creating a new virtual machine in a virtual network created before April 16, 2013; or adding a new virtual machine to an existing cloud service. See Error: “Failed to configure virtual machine” on the support forum for workarounds for each deployment scenario.​​

Select Azure Subscription to work with


When you have a larger organisation, you will have several Azure Subscriptions to work against. So here is how you switch.

1. Open Powershell

2. Type in: Add-AzureRmAccount​
(in pop-up enter admin id and password)

3. It will list up the subscription you are connected to when you have authenticated


4. Type in: Get-AzureRmSubscription
(will list out all your subscriptions)

5. Find the Subscription you want to connect to

6. Type in: Select-AzureRmSubscription -SubscriptionId “ENTER THE SUBSCRIPTION ID”

You can choose SubscriptionName too, but I prefere SubscriptionID


Count directory Objects in Active Directory


Some times you need to find out how many directory Objects you have in your AD.
A quick way of getting this done is to use the following PowerShell​ string

​​Get-ADObject -Filter {name -like ‘*’} -SearchBase ‘CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=sameie,DC=COM’ -ResultSetSize $null | Measure-Object >c:\tmp\object_dump.txt

This will dump the information into a easy to read text file

object_count_output.PNG

Now you know how many Objects you have.


No more download 1 GB Test files


Tired of looking on the web for a big test file, or creating your own locally?
Then this is perfect for you too 🙂
Open CMD in administrator mode
Run the following command:
fsutil file createnew <file> <size in bytes>
F.eks this will create a 10 GB file in my tmp folder:
fsutil file createnew c:\tmp\10gb.test 10737418240
The key is to input the size of the file in bytes so here are some common file sizes to save you from math:
1 MB = 1048576 bytes
100 MB = 104857600 bytes
1 GB = 1073741824 bytes
10 GB = 10737418240 bytes
100 GB =107374182400 bytes
1 TB = 1099511627776 bytes
10 TB =10995116277760 bytes

Can’t Create Resources in Resource Group


I created a resource group and gave my colleague the contributor access to the resources group.

Then he was going to deploy Logic App, but got an error that he does not have access and is not authorized. So he tried to deploy a VM, same issue.
I deployed Logic App for him (not problem).

The error he gets looks like this:
Resource creation fails with the error which looks like below- Registering the resource providers has failed. Additional details from the underlying API that might be helpful: ‘AuthorizationFailed’ – The client xxx@xxx.com’ with object id ‘af648edh-5336-sf55-ff2f-14873afdc259’ does not have authorization to perform action ‘Microsoft.Compute/register/action’ over scope ‘/subscriptions/245455vgd4-34gg-afe4-975f-3345gdgs34s’. (Code: AuthorizationFailed)

Hmmmm….. What’s going on here?

With the contributor access to a resource group, you can create a resource e.g. a VM or Logic App. What went wrong here if we look at the error message and focus on ‘Microsoft.Compute/register/action’ over scope ‘/subscriptions/245455vgd4-34gg-afe4-975f-3345gdgs34s’. is that he is not authorized to create a resource, it is the authorization error to register a resource provider. So how do we solve it?

Well after a bit of Googling if found a solution that worked for me,

  • ​Log into Azure with an identity which has a subscription level access to register a resource provider e.g. admin/owner.
  •  Using PowerShell (PoSh) register the resource providers you need at the subscription level. You can also see which providers are available and registered already.

Open Powershell and enter the following:

– Login-AzureRmAccount

#List out all Subscriptions you have access to
– Get-AzureRmSubscription

– $subscriptionId= “<Subscription Id>”

– Select-AzureRmSubscription -SubscriptionId $subscriptionId

 
#List all available providers and register them
– Get-AzureRmResourceProvider -ListAvailable | Register-AzureRmResourceProvider -Force​​
*****UPDATE****
with the “new” AZ Module, you can now run this command:
Get-AzResourceProvider -ListAvailable | Register-AzResourceProvider

Hello world!


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